Is your company ‘design-capable’?

If you have to prove the value of design, you’re not in a design-capable company! Some tips on getting good design done in your organisation.

How to be a design-capable organisation

In June, I attended (and sketchnoted) a “smart salon” panel discussion at the Museum of London, which addressed the status of design in organisations. It was about how to make organisations ‘design capable’, not necessarily design-driven or design-led. This free event was hosted by the Smart Design agency and was attended by people from diverse industries and sectors – I saw name badges showing pharmaceutical companies, banks, financial services, retail/e-commerce companies, not-for-profits and lots of others.

One panel, many perspectives

The panelists at this event included representatives from five organisations, who spoke about the strategic management of design activities in their companies. They were:

  • Clive Grinyer, Process Improvement Director, Barclays
  • Marianna Wickman, Global Head of UX and Design, BBVA
  • Angus Montgomery, Creative Writer, UK Government Digital Service
  • Darren Morgan, Senior Global Design Manager, RB (Reckitt Benckiser)
  • Catalina Cernica, Head of LEO Innovation, Leo Pharma
  • [Moderator] Sean O’Connor, Partner, Smart Design London
Smart Salon Discussion Panel

Smart Salon Discussion Panel

What did we learn?

Five key messages emerged throughout the discussion:

  1. A design-capable company doesn’t need to measure the value of design;
  2. When design is new to an organisation, there are misconceptions about what it is, and how it benefits the business;
  3. The design function in an organisation can take different forms, but a hybrid approach of ‘design studio’ and ‘dispersed designers’ tends to work best;
  4. Design must challenge the business;
  5. If there is no design, there is no project!

1. A design-capable company doesn’t need to measure the value of design

To get the discussion going, the moderator invited the panellists to share their challenges measuring and demonstrating the value of design in their organisations. Some of the answers were surprising, for example, paraphrasing Clive Grinyer of Barclays:

“Our digital app is great – we measure it by net promoter score; but otherwise I have given up measuring the value of design. Since the design function at Barclays is no longer a discrete unit, rather it is dispersed throughout the business, it isn’t needed to be measured. Once great design was delivered we never looked back. We gave up measuring the value of it.”

Marianna of BBVA echoed the sentiment:

“It’s a bad sign when you are asked to measure your UX success. You wouldn’t ask this for something like project management, or other management processes.  You shouldn’t ask it of design.”

What these points highlighted was that the level of maturity of UX design capability determines how managers perceive its function. For example, stakeholders in organisations where design is done well seem to take it for granted: it becomes second nature and its role in delivering great products/services and well-designed internal processes is not questioned. So it does not need to be quantified and presented per se.

From this observation it may be fair to assume that if your organisation is asking you to measure the impact, or benefits, of design/UX design, it may indicate that there is a long road to travel before your organisation can be truly design-capable.

2. When design is new to an organisation, there are misconceptions about what it is and its benefits to the business

Companies with less mature design capability can employ different strategies to give it a boost. When Leo pharma’s Catalina Cernica, whose organisation is comparatively new to digital design and UX, was asked to comment on this, she said  (paraphrasing):

“We are taking baby steps in design. The pharmaceutical industry is now going beyond the pill – kicking and screaming! At Leo we have a digital app to go along with our products; this is new territory for us.”

Catalina mentioned that design was sometimes perceived only as an idea-generating operation, and was told in the past that her design team “was not here to solve problems, just to generate ideas”. This suggests that when starting out with design in an organisation, there can be misconceptions about what it actually is.

Similarly, Marianna told the audience that she always explains what is meant by “design” before presenting any idea/pitch to colleagues who are unfamiliar with UX and design. Clearly, there are still occasions when colleagues understand design to be limited to visual appeal.

My take-home from this discussion was that communication and perception of design are handled well in a design-capable organisation.

3. The design function in an organisation can take different forms, but usually a hybrid approach of ‘design studio’ and ‘dispersed designers’ tends to work best

Since the discussion was about management of design in organisations, the moderator naturally asked the panellists about the way in which design functions are structured in their companies. Clive Grinyer explained:

“Barclays don’t have a ‘design team’.  The design agency ‘feel’ does not connect with the banking business. Instead, design happens throughout the business.  Previously, post-crash, we had a new design team, and scooped up creative talent to Canary Wharf (which wasn’t easy to sell to creatives!) But it grew and we hoovered up the best people. Now, design is integrated and embedded. That’s why my job title is Process Improvement, which is a core business role, even though I have come from a design background.”

To counter Clive’s point, Angus Montgomery of the UK Government Digital Service, said it is important to build a business where designers want to work. But how are they doing it at GDS?  Would designers really want to work at a bank or government department?

Maybe not, but it can be made an inspirational place to work by writing about case studies and speaking about valuable design projects – this makes the organisation aspirational. Angus said:

“You don’t want the design culture to get lost in the organisation.”

Marianna BBVA’s added:

“We want a ‘design destination’: a design studio feel. We have a design education scheme going internally. We want to educate colleagues, why design matters to the business. Getting the right talent is easier with a design studio in the business.”

Does a design-capable company have a dedicated design studio, distributed designers, or some mix of the two?

Marianna summed up how to structure your organisation’s design capability: There are three options (the best choice depends on the organisation):

  1. Have a dedicated design team, a.k.a. “design studio”, internally.
  2. Have designers distributed throughout the organisation, effectively embedding design deep into your operation. You might not even call the people who do it ‘designers’.
  3. A hybrid of 1 and 2.

So why is a hybrid your best bet? Because having designers embedded means you are taking design thinking deep into what your company does/is. Good design will therefore influence all the decisions that you make – for internal processes, making products, delivering customer services, etc. By having a dedicated design team as well, you have an aspirational place for designers where they can try out new ideas, share best practice, compare tools and approaches – and, importantly, recruit great design talent.

What about third party companies and design?

Even with the hybrid model, it can be helpful to get outside influence to challenge norms. Darren Morgan spoke on this point:

“We encourage work from external partners or design agencies, because this can challenge the thinking of departments in the business. This can be harder for agencies to do. But it’s a good way to get new ideas in.”

4. Design must challenge the business

Clive presented his method for recognising ‘design-incapability’:

“A company that does not want to be challenged by its design function is NOT a design-capable company. In reality, there are few companies that can actually be design-capable – unless the founders are designers, or designers rise up to the top management positions.”

5. If there is no design, there is no project!

Even if your organisation has become design-capable – when there are no human resources for design work, the project should not go ahead.  Simple.

Marianna put it clearly:

“The most impactful thing we are doing at BBVA is say “NO!”.  When a company says no to thorough design work on basis of lack of resources, we simply won’t do the project. Unless you have the right talent to do the project we don’t do the project!”

Summing up…

Design capability can only come when leaders of organisations are wise to the benefits of design. To achieve this, we either need to have designers rising up to become managers (leaving typical design activities to others), or hire managers who are already effectively ‘design-evangelised’.

In all scenarios, grass-roots designers – wherever they may be in the company hierarchy – must continue to deliver exemplary work so that the value of design as a function will be recognised and, hopefully, in time, become endemic. Good design by market rivals or peer organisations may also spur on improvements in design work.

Discussions, conferences, workshops, and events such as the one reviewed here, all help to get the word out that design is important to the bottom line. If good design can deliver clear benefit to organisations, even to those historically design-poor and technology-oriented like banks and pharmaceutical companies, then people need to know about it!

We need to get creating more design-capable establishments, right now.

To read mode, the discussion moderator, Sean O’Connor has posted his highlights of the event at the Smart Design blog.  Thanks to Smart Design for hosting such an interesting (and free) event!

Links

Sketchnote of the panel discussion

Smart Design Blog article

Smart salon event

Smart design

Video clips

Taken from the Smart Design Blog article

Disclaimer: The quotes in this article are from memory, so capture the overall sentiment of the discussion rather than exact phrasing from individuals.

Javascript: sold out

Registration for the Javascript Tips & Best Practices event mentioned in my previous post opened on January 17 and co-organiser, Rafael Jimenez, and I held our breath.

We knew that lots of people, both on the Genome Camps and off it, were interested but we were less sure about the extent to which that would translate into actually selling places! Turns out that we needn’t have worried.

Places were sold out in a record 29 minutes. Now, there’s a waiting list and it looks as though we could run the same event a week later and fill it. Phew.

Screengrab from jsbestpractices.com

Screengrab from jsbestpractices.com

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Javascript

Between February 26th and 28th, the EBI will play host to Javascript Tips & Best Practices: A hands-on workshop. Over the course of three days, participants will learn about Javascript for modern web development, as well as have an opportunity to talk about how they’re using Javascript in their work.

Since the summer of 2013, I’ve been working with my colleague, Rafael Jimenez, to take this from an idea to reality. Though we hope to have lots of interest from staff at both the EBI and the Sanger Institute, the event is open to anyone.

EBI-southbuilding-interior

Inside the European Bioinformatics Institute

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Participatory design: including people in the design process at UX Cambridge 2012

This blog post is long overdue. At UX Cambridge 2012, I was lucky enough to be joined by my friends Mel Findlater (@melfindlater) and David “Sheff” Barker (@mcshefferty) in running a workshop called “Design for Society”. The aim was to give participants an taste of running a participatory design session, and we included both UX designers (conference attendees) and “real people” – in this case, long-term wheelchair users and their carers. Thank you to everyone who took part!

Participatory design workshop participants

Designers and non-designers working together to understand design problems. With Lego.

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Improving the EMBL-EBI online experience: a poster on the EBI website ‘rethink’

Here is a preview of Jenny Cham’s poster for the ISMB/ECCB 2013 conference happening in Berlin, 19-23 July 2013:

Jenny Cham's ISMB poster

Jenny Cham’s poster for ISMB [PDF]

The poster tells the story of the EMBL-EBI website redesign

The poster (number B44 at the conference) is a timeline showing the process we used to redesign the website from start to finish (although it’s never really finished!)  As far as possible, we applied a user-centred design philosophy – where evidence from users helped us to decide on the layout, the way search works, navigation, and other stuff.

We used BBC’s Global Experience Language (BBC GEL) as a shining example

BBC GEL provided the inspiration we needed to create style guidelines for the new site.  These include a style guide, design patterns and other advice (such as UX techniques), which designers and developers can follow to make the look and feel (and behaviour) of webpages consistent across diverse services under the EBI banner.  These guidelines will be available later this year, via the EBI website.

Acknowledgement of help

Jenny would like to thank Spencer Phillips (Graphic designer at EMBL-EBI) for his tips on improving the timeline and call out boxes in this poster.  Thank you!

See you in Berlin!

As well as the poster, check out Jenny’s talk on Tuesday 23 July (12.00-12.25, Hall 7) “Designing with the user in mind: how UCD can work for bioinformatics”

Links

ISMB/ECCB 2013 conference page