Information wayfinding – Tyler Tate

Tyler Tate - head & shouldersIt was great to have Tyler Tate come and speak on campus again. He was previously here, back in October 2010, speaking about maximising findability, and the “scent of search”.

This time round, Tyler was expanding on some of that thinking, and talked to us about information wayfinding – the concept of helping people locate themselves in an information space, and navigate around it efficiently.

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Upcoming talks, autumn 2011

We have three great events to go before Christmas (hey, they’re already selling Christmas puddings in the shops!).

October 17, 14h00 -15h00, Webinar: “Principles of Web Navigation: Advanced Design Techniques” (one hour) - James Kalbach

November 14, 15h00 – 16h00, Talk: “The language of software: the role of content strategy in software development” - Des Traynor

December 1, 15h00 – 16h00, Talk: “Secrets of Simplicity” - Giles Colborne

The webinar will be in C209 (near Sanger reception), and the talks will be in M203 (next to the restaurant).

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Guest Speaker: Roy Ruddle – Navigation in information spaces, and using giga-pixel displays to visualize biological data

We are very happy to announce Roy Ruddle as our next guest speaker. Roy is a Reader in Interactive Systems, and a member of the Visualization and Virtual Reality research group at the University of Leeds.

WHEN: June 18th, 14h00

WHERE: M203 (the function room next to Murray’s restaurant), Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton

TITLE: Navigation in information spaces, and using giga-pixel displays to visualize biological data
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Review: Search User Interfaces

The book, Search User Interfaces (CUP) was published in autumn 2009, and is written by Marti A. Hearst, professor at University of California, Berkeley, who has done research on search user interfaces for 15 years. It would make an excellent addition to the bookshelf of anyone interested in search and navigation design.

It was thanks to Nils that I found out about it, and I think both of us have a copy now. I haven’t read mine cover-to-cover, preferring instead to dip in and out, reading various sections or whole chapters as required.

I got my copy at the Cambridge University Press (CUP) shop in Cambridge, but it also available on Amazon.

Even better… in an effort to maximise the impact of her writing, Hearst was able to convince CUP to allow her to also make the book available for free, in HTML format, on her website, so you can check it out there, too. This means you can also electronically search the book, which is really handy. I have found myself using both the hardcopy and the online copy.

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