Participatory design: including people in the design process at UX Cambridge 2012

This blog post is long overdue. At UX Cambridge 2012, I was lucky enough to be joined by my friends Mel Findlater (@melfindlater) and David “Sheff” Barker (@mcshefferty) in running a workshop called “Design for Society”. The aim was to give participants an taste of running a participatory design session, and we included both UX designers (conference attendees) and “real people” – in this case, long-term wheelchair users and their carers. Thank you to everyone who took part!

Participatory design workshop participants

Designers and non-designers working together to understand design problems. With Lego.

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Free Access to UIE’s 2010 Web App Masters Tour Show Until 14 March

UIE (User Interface Engineering) are giving free access to their Web App Masters Tour Show — just sign up with your email address before Monday 14 March.

The recordings and slide decks contain great information like dealing with complex navigation, integrating social components, moving away from static forms, and using design patterns.

You’ll hear from top web app masters like Luke Wroblewski, Hagan Rivers, Bill Scott, Stephen Anderson, and Jared Spool. And you’ll get the details on Facebook, Twitter, 37signals, and Marriott Corporation’s design process.

Webinar on Findability

Tyler Tate photo

Those of you who deal with search interfaces might be interested to check out a free webinar, entitled “Findability – Designing the Search Experience“, to be given by Tyler Tate on Wednesday, August 18th, 18:00 GMT.

Sign up to attend this webinar (requires registration).

Search interfaces are a really fascinating area of user experience design, given how widely-used that kind of interface is.

Tyler Tate has lots of UX design experience, and published a really good article last year on minimising complexity in user interfaces, and another good one not long ago on “the scent of search“.

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XKCD Color Survey

The guy behind xkcd did a colour survey relatively recently. The idea behind the survey was to test users visual perception of colours, so what they identify as being red, green, blue and so forth. Moreover, it tests the differences in perception between males and females (and the maturity of the responses :) ).

If you’re particularly interested in colour, here are some links:
Poynton colour FAQ

Wikipedia entry on colour

Tutorial: Matias Piipari – Cocoa for Scientists

We are very happy to announce a Cocoa tutorial by Matias Piipari from the Sanger Institute. Matias has created iMotifs (http://wiki.github.com/mz2/imotifs), a sequence motif editor and analysis environment for Mac OS X and some pretty cool iPhone apps (http://www.pearcomp.com).
 
This will be a great opportunity to find out how to get started with your own Mac OS X development.
 
WHEN: May 20, 14h00 – 15h00
 
WHERE: A2-33 (EBI)
 

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