Talk: Design games for prioritising requirements

Our talk for March will be on “design games for prioritising requirements“.

WHEN: 13h00, March 16
WHERE: M203 (the function room next to Murrays restaurant, where the HSF meetings take place), Wellcome Trust Genome Campus, Hinxton

Requirements prioritisation games

I am very pleased to introduce Neil Turner and Rob Kerr, both UX designers from Cambridge Assessment. Like some of us, they work in an area where many of the “norms” of UX and interaction design cannot be directly applied, and they have to be adapted to fit the needs of a project.

Part of this is working out what work to do given the constraints of time and resources. Often, when we begin a project, there is a long list of elements and features that we want to include. There is rarely time, however, to realise all of those things, so we need to concentrate on what is most important in terms of a) delivering the “business goals” of the end product, and b) providing the key services and features that will benefit our users. It is important to prioritise work, and do what matters, rather than what looks easy, or what the loudest voice shouts for.

So how do we tackle that? Design games are a way to make this sort of thing fun; to involve everyone; to work with project tasks in a hands-on way. Donna Spencer, freelance information architect, interaction designer trainer and speaker, knows plenty about this subject, and talked about it at UX Lisbon 2010. She suggests that the four main things that design games should feature are:

  1. They are fun, involving play to promote creativity.
  2. They are hands-on, about making ideas real, not just talking about them.
  3. They are useful, as opposed to the dreaded team-building exercise.
  4. They are structured: they have goals and are planned so the goal is met.

Neil and Rob will talk to us about some of the things that have worked for them… and perhaps even try some of them live.

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